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prepaidafrica:

Global Ankara Trend: The Colourful Fabric Revolutionizing International Fashion
From the streets of Lagos, to countless boardrooms, to catwalks all over the world, the Ankara fabric has proven to be so versatile that it is now recognized on the global fashion scene. A number of celebrities have been spotted in Ankara ensembles on red carpets globally.
To many, the Ankara fabric has become a wardrobe staple already. The fabric is used to make a growing number of fashion items; bags, shoes, dresses, jewellery and countless accessories. This development has led to a change in the general perception of the Ankara fabric worldwide.
According the article Fashion Reborn: Blends of African outfits from Ankara, by fibre2fashion “Destiny of the ‘once before’ cheap Ankara fabrics, have undergone a magical transformation. Elegant creativity of the designers has made it a preferred choice of the rich and celebrities.”
The African print fabric has metamorphosed from cultural attire to a glamorous wardrobe must-have and right now the spotlight is on Africa.
This Ankara trend has impacted the West African economy in a lot of ways and thus, the Nigerian economy. In the mid- 1980s, there were around 180 functional textile mills in Nigeria. The mills employed approximately a million people, this accounted for more than 60 percent of the textile industry capacity in West Africa, empowering millions of households across all geopolitical zones of Nigeria. This however changed shortly as the sector crashed into an industrial abyss. During this period, the number of textile companies dropped from about 180 to almost zero. This was revealed by an article on Nigeria’s textile economy titled: Nigeria’s Textile Industry on a Rebound?.
However, in recent times, the sector has rebounded. The number of functioning textile companies has risen once more to 25. While the industry may not be at its former place of glory, a steady incline can be noted in the growth of the industry which is largely due to the current global Ankara trend.
The rise in the demand of the fabric which was not too long ago considered to be a fabric for the poor or restricted to cultural festivities due to its brightly coloured patterns and relative low cost, has led to a corresponding rise in the production of the material.
Also, aside from the lower priced brands, a lot more textile factories have started producing the Ankara fabric in more appealing and sophisticated designs. Furthermore, due to the ready availability of Ankara in the local market, it has become the preferred choice of fabric when making custom designed outfits.
What was once considered to be a local market has grown exponentially to meet the increasing demands for the fabric worldwide. African designers and their Ankara designs are now sought out in all the echelons of the global society.
The Ankara fashion industry has proven to be a veritable goldmine in these ways and many more.
 Ed’s note: Do read the rest of the article
prepaidafrica:

Global Ankara Trend: The Colourful Fabric Revolutionizing International Fashion
From the streets of Lagos, to countless boardrooms, to catwalks all over the world, the Ankara fabric has proven to be so versatile that it is now recognized on the global fashion scene. A number of celebrities have been spotted in Ankara ensembles on red carpets globally.
To many, the Ankara fabric has become a wardrobe staple already. The fabric is used to make a growing number of fashion items; bags, shoes, dresses, jewellery and countless accessories. This development has led to a change in the general perception of the Ankara fabric worldwide.
According the article Fashion Reborn: Blends of African outfits from Ankara, by fibre2fashion “Destiny of the ‘once before’ cheap Ankara fabrics, have undergone a magical transformation. Elegant creativity of the designers has made it a preferred choice of the rich and celebrities.”
The African print fabric has metamorphosed from cultural attire to a glamorous wardrobe must-have and right now the spotlight is on Africa.
This Ankara trend has impacted the West African economy in a lot of ways and thus, the Nigerian economy. In the mid- 1980s, there were around 180 functional textile mills in Nigeria. The mills employed approximately a million people, this accounted for more than 60 percent of the textile industry capacity in West Africa, empowering millions of households across all geopolitical zones of Nigeria. This however changed shortly as the sector crashed into an industrial abyss. During this period, the number of textile companies dropped from about 180 to almost zero. This was revealed by an article on Nigeria’s textile economy titled: Nigeria’s Textile Industry on a Rebound?.
However, in recent times, the sector has rebounded. The number of functioning textile companies has risen once more to 25. While the industry may not be at its former place of glory, a steady incline can be noted in the growth of the industry which is largely due to the current global Ankara trend.
The rise in the demand of the fabric which was not too long ago considered to be a fabric for the poor or restricted to cultural festivities due to its brightly coloured patterns and relative low cost, has led to a corresponding rise in the production of the material.
Also, aside from the lower priced brands, a lot more textile factories have started producing the Ankara fabric in more appealing and sophisticated designs. Furthermore, due to the ready availability of Ankara in the local market, it has become the preferred choice of fabric when making custom designed outfits.
What was once considered to be a local market has grown exponentially to meet the increasing demands for the fabric worldwide. African designers and their Ankara designs are now sought out in all the echelons of the global society.
The Ankara fashion industry has proven to be a veritable goldmine in these ways and many more.
 Ed’s note: Do read the rest of the article

prepaidafrica:

Global Ankara Trend: The Colourful Fabric Revolutionizing International Fashion

From the streets of Lagos, to countless boardrooms, to catwalks all over the world, the Ankara fabric has proven to be so versatile that it is now recognized on the global fashion scene. A number of celebrities have been spotted in Ankara ensembles on red carpets globally.

To many, the Ankara fabric has become a wardrobe staple already. The fabric is used to make a growing number of fashion items; bags, shoes, dresses, jewellery and countless accessories. This development has led to a change in the general perception of the Ankara fabric worldwide.

According the article Fashion Reborn: Blends of African outfits from Ankara, by fibre2fashion “Destiny of the ‘once before’ cheap Ankara fabrics, have undergone a magical transformation. Elegant creativity of the designers has made it a preferred choice of the rich and celebrities.”

The African print fabric has metamorphosed from cultural attire to a glamorous wardrobe must-have and right now the spotlight is on Africa.

This Ankara trend has impacted the West African economy in a lot of ways and thus, the Nigerian economy. In the mid- 1980s, there were around 180 functional textile mills in Nigeria. The mills employed approximately a million people, this accounted for more than 60 percent of the textile industry capacity in West Africa, empowering millions of households across all geopolitical zones of Nigeria. This however changed shortly as the sector crashed into an industrial abyss. During this period, the number of textile companies dropped from about 180 to almost zero. This was revealed by an article on Nigeria’s textile economy titled: Nigeria’s Textile Industry on a Rebound?.

However, in recent times, the sector has rebounded. The number of functioning textile companies has risen once more to 25. While the industry may not be at its former place of glory, a steady incline can be noted in the growth of the industry which is largely due to the current global Ankara trend.

The rise in the demand of the fabric which was not too long ago considered to be a fabric for the poor or restricted to cultural festivities due to its brightly coloured patterns and relative low cost, has led to a corresponding rise in the production of the material.

Also, aside from the lower priced brands, a lot more textile factories have started producing the Ankara fabric in more appealing and sophisticated designs. Furthermore, due to the ready availability of Ankara in the local market, it has become the preferred choice of fabric when making custom designed outfits.

What was once considered to be a local market has grown exponentially to meet the increasing demands for the fabric worldwide. African designers and their Ankara designs are now sought out in all the echelons of the global society.

The Ankara fashion industry has proven to be a veritable goldmine in these ways and many more.


Ed’s note: Do read the rest of the article

petarted:

Probably some of my favorite photos I’ve ever taken.

Rented some tradition wooden plank boats used by fishermen in Ghana and met some young Ghanaians who definitely showed us a thing or two how it’s done. Thankful I was able to wade out and capture some awesome shots of these guys.

dynamicafrica:

WOMEN’S MONTH POST: Ten Years On: Remembering Brenda Fassie.
The Brenda Fassie sculpture, created by artist Angus Taylor, is a 1570-metre life-size bronze that stands outside the Bassline music venue.
It was installed in March 2006 and was the first of 40 sculptures commissioned by the Sunday Times newspaper in celebration of its 100th birthday. The sculpture features Brenda sitting on a stool behind a microphone standing on the ground. The text superimposed on Fassie’s body is made up of quotes by the artist on her relationship with the media. The empty stool by her side invites passers-by to take their seat next to this music legend.
This black plaque, one of which appears at the base of each sculpture belonging to the Sunday Times heritage project, provides a brief summary of Brenda Fassie’s life. It reads: “Brenda Fassie, known as the Madonna of the townships, was one of Africa’s biggest home-grown stars, South Africa’s top-selling local artist and what her record company EMI called ‘a once-in-a-generation artist, a true idol’. But for most she was MaBrrr or simply Brenda, a phenomenon like no other. As Brenda once said while talking to fans on Umhlobo Wenene FM, ‘I will always be this way.’”
To find out more about this story go to www.sundaytimes.co.za/heritage
dynamicafrica:

WOMEN’S MONTH POST: Ten Years On: Remembering Brenda Fassie.
The Brenda Fassie sculpture, created by artist Angus Taylor, is a 1570-metre life-size bronze that stands outside the Bassline music venue.
It was installed in March 2006 and was the first of 40 sculptures commissioned by the Sunday Times newspaper in celebration of its 100th birthday. The sculpture features Brenda sitting on a stool behind a microphone standing on the ground. The text superimposed on Fassie’s body is made up of quotes by the artist on her relationship with the media. The empty stool by her side invites passers-by to take their seat next to this music legend.
This black plaque, one of which appears at the base of each sculpture belonging to the Sunday Times heritage project, provides a brief summary of Brenda Fassie’s life. It reads: “Brenda Fassie, known as the Madonna of the townships, was one of Africa’s biggest home-grown stars, South Africa’s top-selling local artist and what her record company EMI called ‘a once-in-a-generation artist, a true idol’. But for most she was MaBrrr or simply Brenda, a phenomenon like no other. As Brenda once said while talking to fans on Umhlobo Wenene FM, ‘I will always be this way.’”
To find out more about this story go to www.sundaytimes.co.za/heritage

dynamicafrica:

WOMEN’S MONTH POST: Ten Years On: Remembering Brenda Fassie.

The Brenda Fassie sculpture, created by artist Angus Taylor, is a 1570-metre life-size bronze that stands outside the Bassline music venue.

It was installed in March 2006 and was the first of 40 sculptures commissioned by the Sunday Times newspaper in celebration of its 100th birthday. The sculpture features Brenda sitting on a stool behind a microphone standing on the ground. The text superimposed on Fassie’s body is made up of quotes by the artist on her relationship with the media. The empty stool by her side invites passers-by to take their seat next to this music legend.

This black plaque, one of which appears at the base of each sculpture belonging to the Sunday Times heritage project, provides a brief summary of Brenda Fassie’s life. It reads: “Brenda Fassie, known as the Madonna of the townships, was one of Africa’s biggest home-grown stars, South Africa’s top-selling local artist and what her record company EMI called ‘a once-in-a-generation artist, a true idol’. But for most she was MaBrrr or simply Brenda, a phenomenon like no other. As Brenda once said while talking to fans on Umhlobo Wenene FM, ‘I will always be this way.’”

To find out more about this story go to www.sundaytimes.co.za/heritage

yearningforunity:

a—fri—ca:

The Ishango Bone, the world’s oldest mathematical object found in Africa
Most histories of mathematics devote only a few pages to Ancient Egypt and to northern Africa during the ‘Middle Ages´. Generally they ignore the history of mathematics in Africa south of the Sahara and give the impression that this history either did not exist or, at least, is not knowable, traceable, or, stronger still, that there was no mathematics at all south of the Sahara. In history, to Europeans, even the Africanity of Egyptian mathematics is often denied or suffers eurocentric views of conceptions of both ‘history’ and of ‘mathematics’ form the basis of such views.
The Ishango Bone was discovered in 1960 by Jean Heinzelin Braucourt, a Belgian national who was exploring the eastern fringes of the Democratic republic of Congo, then Belgian Congo. The bone was found among the ruins of a human settlement that was located near Lake Edward, an ancient settlement that had been buried by a volcanic eruption. It is a dark brown length of bone, the fibula of a baboon, with a sharp piece of quartz affixed to one end, perhaps for engraving.  
 Evidently the Ishango bone was designed as a tool for making incisions, but its bone handle was itself incised. The arrangement of the notches engraved on the handle, and the numbers in each group, are clearly not casual. Analysis of their numerological properties has led several investigators to conclude that the artefact is not a simple tally stick, but a kind of calculator based on special number systems. 
The artifact was first estimated to have originated between 9,000 BC and 6,500 BC. However, the dating of the site where it was discovered was re-evaluated, and it is now believed to be more than 20,000 years old.
The Ishango bone is on permanent display in l’Institut Royal Belge des Sciences Naturelles, Brussels, Belgium.
( Ishango Bone - UNESCO Astronomy and World Heritage - an old Mathematical Object)
yearningforunity:

a—fri—ca:

The Ishango Bone, the world’s oldest mathematical object found in Africa
Most histories of mathematics devote only a few pages to Ancient Egypt and to northern Africa during the ‘Middle Ages´. Generally they ignore the history of mathematics in Africa south of the Sahara and give the impression that this history either did not exist or, at least, is not knowable, traceable, or, stronger still, that there was no mathematics at all south of the Sahara. In history, to Europeans, even the Africanity of Egyptian mathematics is often denied or suffers eurocentric views of conceptions of both ‘history’ and of ‘mathematics’ form the basis of such views.
The Ishango Bone was discovered in 1960 by Jean Heinzelin Braucourt, a Belgian national who was exploring the eastern fringes of the Democratic republic of Congo, then Belgian Congo. The bone was found among the ruins of a human settlement that was located near Lake Edward, an ancient settlement that had been buried by a volcanic eruption. It is a dark brown length of bone, the fibula of a baboon, with a sharp piece of quartz affixed to one end, perhaps for engraving.  
 Evidently the Ishango bone was designed as a tool for making incisions, but its bone handle was itself incised. The arrangement of the notches engraved on the handle, and the numbers in each group, are clearly not casual. Analysis of their numerological properties has led several investigators to conclude that the artefact is not a simple tally stick, but a kind of calculator based on special number systems. 
The artifact was first estimated to have originated between 9,000 BC and 6,500 BC. However, the dating of the site where it was discovered was re-evaluated, and it is now believed to be more than 20,000 years old.
The Ishango bone is on permanent display in l’Institut Royal Belge des Sciences Naturelles, Brussels, Belgium.
( Ishango Bone - UNESCO Astronomy and World Heritage - an old Mathematical Object)
yearningforunity:

a—fri—ca:

The Ishango Bone, the world’s oldest mathematical object found in Africa
Most histories of mathematics devote only a few pages to Ancient Egypt and to northern Africa during the ‘Middle Ages´. Generally they ignore the history of mathematics in Africa south of the Sahara and give the impression that this history either did not exist or, at least, is not knowable, traceable, or, stronger still, that there was no mathematics at all south of the Sahara. In history, to Europeans, even the Africanity of Egyptian mathematics is often denied or suffers eurocentric views of conceptions of both ‘history’ and of ‘mathematics’ form the basis of such views.
The Ishango Bone was discovered in 1960 by Jean Heinzelin Braucourt, a Belgian national who was exploring the eastern fringes of the Democratic republic of Congo, then Belgian Congo. The bone was found among the ruins of a human settlement that was located near Lake Edward, an ancient settlement that had been buried by a volcanic eruption. It is a dark brown length of bone, the fibula of a baboon, with a sharp piece of quartz affixed to one end, perhaps for engraving.  
 Evidently the Ishango bone was designed as a tool for making incisions, but its bone handle was itself incised. The arrangement of the notches engraved on the handle, and the numbers in each group, are clearly not casual. Analysis of their numerological properties has led several investigators to conclude that the artefact is not a simple tally stick, but a kind of calculator based on special number systems. 
The artifact was first estimated to have originated between 9,000 BC and 6,500 BC. However, the dating of the site where it was discovered was re-evaluated, and it is now believed to be more than 20,000 years old.
The Ishango bone is on permanent display in l’Institut Royal Belge des Sciences Naturelles, Brussels, Belgium.
( Ishango Bone - UNESCO Astronomy and World Heritage - an old Mathematical Object)

yearningforunity:

a—fri—ca:

The Ishango Bone, the world’s oldest mathematical object found in Africa

Most histories of mathematics devote only a few pages to Ancient Egypt and to northern Africa during the ‘Middle Ages´. Generally they ignore the history of mathematics in Africa south of the Sahara and give the impression that this history either did not exist or, at least, is not knowable, traceable, or, stronger still, that there was no mathematics at all south of the Sahara. In history, to Europeans, even the Africanity of Egyptian mathematics is often denied or suffers eurocentric views of conceptions of both ‘history’ and of ‘mathematics’ form the basis of such views.

The Ishango Bone was discovered in 1960 by Jean Heinzelin Braucourt, a Belgian national who was exploring the eastern fringes of the Democratic republic of Congo, then Belgian Congo. The bone was found among the ruins of a human settlement that was located near Lake Edward, an ancient settlement that had been buried by a volcanic eruption. It is a dark brown length of bone, the fibula of a baboon, with a sharp piece of quartz affixed to one end, perhaps for engraving.  

 Evidently the Ishango bone was designed as a tool for making incisions, but its bone handle was itself incised. The arrangement of the notches engraved on the handle, and the numbers in each group, are clearly not casual. Analysis of their numerological properties has led several investigators to conclude that the artefact is not a simple tally stick, but a kind of calculator based on special number systems. 

The artifact was first estimated to have originated between 9,000 BC and 6,500 BC. However, the dating of the site where it was discovered was re-evaluated, and it is now believed to be more than 20,000 years old.

The Ishango bone is on permanent display in l’Institut Royal Belge des Sciences Naturelles, Brussels, Belgium.

Ishango Bone - UNESCO Astronomy and World Heritage - an old Mathematical Object)

nevermindreal:

John Salmon, inscribed:Basuto South Africa, c. 1870s Carte de visite
nevermindreal:

John Salmon, inscribed:Basuto South Africa, c. 1870s Carte de visite

nevermindreal:

John Salmon, inscribed:
Basuto
South Africa, c. 1870s
Carte de visite

New Music: M.I. Abaga “King James”

loudsoundgh:

New Music: M.I. Abaga “King James”

No one ever argues when its said M.I. Abaga is the best rapper in Africa! The Hiphop Kingkong drops another exclusive music he calls “King James” after the huge anticipation across the continent. The release of this song was a history on its own and not to talk about the lyrical prowess exhibited in the song. The song was premièred on a number of radio stations across the continent and they all…

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nevermindreal:

M. Veniery, inscribed:Choubouk Sudan, early twentieth century Gelatin or collodion printedout print mounted on card
nevermindreal:

M. Veniery, inscribed:Choubouk Sudan, early twentieth century Gelatin or collodion printedout print mounted on card

nevermindreal:

M. Veniery, inscribed:
Choubouk
Sudan, early twentieth century
Gelatin or collodion printedout print mounted on card

nevermindreal:

A.C. Gomes & Son, inscribed:Views in Zanzibar – Natives Hairdressing, Tanzania Late nineteenth century
nevermindreal:

A.C. Gomes & Son, inscribed:Views in Zanzibar – Natives Hairdressing, Tanzania Late nineteenth century

nevermindreal:

A.C. Gomes & Son, inscribed:
Views in Zanzibar – Natives Hairdressing, Tanzania
Late nineteenth century

koreaunderground:

globalpoetics:

The Violent Xenophobic Racism in Ireland

At 9pm last Tuesday, 44-year-old Chinese doctor, Wu Youzhong, went to investigate the sound of breaking glass outside his home in Coleraine, County Londonderry, in Ireland. When he arrived at his front door, he saw that the window had been smashed. An intruder then attacked him so violently that he had to be admitted to hospital for several days, and required consultation from an eye specialist. Dr Wu’s wife, Luo Ruoyin, said, “I heard he was just screaming in pain and I was scared. He was just holding his head and covering his eyes and blood was just running down everywhere.” The police are treating the attack as racially motivated; the couple, who have a two-year-old daughter, are reported to be intending to move away from the area.

The Chinese community in Ireland has long been a target of racial discrimination. Anna Lo, an Alliance Party politician born in Hong Kong who was elected to the Ireland Assembly in 2007, was the first politician from an ethnic minority at national level in Ireland, as well as the first East Asian to be elected anywhere in Britain. Her campaign was dogged by violent racism – including death threats – to the extent that she had to carry a panic alarm as a precaution. One far-Right website published pornographic images of Chinese women, alongside derogatory references to Anna Lo. “People from ethnic minorities are very frightened,” she said. “I have never seen ethnic minorities so fearful in Ireland.”

Read More: http://blogs.telegraph.co.uk/news/jakewallissimons/100181659/sectarian-hatred-is-being-overtaken-by-xenophobic-racism-in-northern-ireland/

the crumbling myth of white supremacy. white supremacy is violent. white supremacy is destructive. white supremacy is pervasive. white supremacy kills.