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This is Africa, from the grasslands to the bubbling cities, our aim is to educate and showcase the Africa many of us know, that others never get to see. The Africa we know & love, our Africa.

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howtobeafuckinglady:

Let’s talk about Naomi, Iman, and Bethann Hardison DRAGGING the fashion industry this morning on Good Morning America. 

badass-bharat-deafmuslim-artista:

lionofallah:

A time for joy, A time for togetherness, A time to remember the Blessings of Allah..
May Allah Bless you & make you of those who receive Glad Tidings in this life and the next. Ameen!
Taqabbal Allah Minna Wa Minkum
May Allah accept it from us and you. Ameen!
Eid Mubarak!
-www.lionofAllah.com

Eid Mubarak to all my Muslim brothers and sisters. May Allah bring joyous blessings to all of our families. May Allah unite and strengthen the Ummah. Ameen.

badass-bharat-deafmuslim-artista:

lionofallah:

A time for joy,
A time for togetherness,
A time to remember the Blessings of Allah..

May Allah Bless you & make you of those who receive Glad Tidings in this life and the next. Ameen!

Taqabbal Allah Minna Wa Minkum

May Allah accept it from us and you. Ameen!

Eid Mubarak!

-www.lionofAllah.com

Eid Mubarak to all my Muslim brothers and sisters. May Allah bring joyous blessings to all of our families. May Allah unite and strengthen the Ummah. Ameen.

The world’s gaze may be on the conflict in Gaza or eastern Ukraine, but a historic epidemic is ravaging West Africa: The world’s deadliest Ebola outbreak has spread to three countries, with the death toll growing.

Since the outbreak began in March, the World Health Organization (WHO) reported that over 630 people have died and around 1,000 cases have been reported. As if that’s not enough, the doctor who has been leading the fight against it in Sierra Leone, Sheik Umar Khan, has also been infected.
The celebration of the 20th anniversary of democracy and freedom should not only be an opportunity to take stock of where we come from but to rethink where we want to go in terms of self-determination. History and the future demand that we critically re-evaluate everything to look for the new not only to revive African thought, history and heritage but to redefine global human relations in a way that can easily pass for what is African.
When one looks and listens to business, political and cultural leaders, we are most likely to see and hear speeches of African people that not only reinforce white supremacy but are rooted in European thinking. Our present orientation is not necessarily rooted in African thought, culture and heritage

Join Our Africa - The organization. (NJ-NYC area)

ourafrica:

July 23, 2014 - 7:07 PM

Hello everyone,

Many of you who have been following the blog for the past 4 years, know that I am always looking for a way to help expand it and share our mission with others.

As promised, this year I wanted to go as big as creating an organization. Although I have a blue print of what I would like to construct, I am still thinking big. One of the most important things I’ve learned is that there’s great benefit that comes when having an amazing team. The ability of a team that works together has the power to bring out not just the best—-but the greatest, of those qualities and facilitate them in a way that creates change and maintains continuous growth in the lives of all those who participate & contribute.

I want to create an organization that offers a platform for people who are interested in helping the continuous growth of African communities both at home and in the diaspora. An organization that offers a platform for learning, networking, discussions, investing and so much more. I open this to everyone, not just Africans to join the team.

I am looking for young adults (18yrs-30yrs) in the NJ-NYC area (as we grow, we will expand to other areas) who want to bring their talents and ideas to the table and kick off this organization.

Keep in mind, these are not paid positions (perhaps as we grow and expand, things will change) but as always, all great things take time and dedication. Nonetheless, this looks great on resumes when applying  for jobs!

If you are interested, please email your resume to vivian@ourAfricaBlog.com

If you’re not, please share and reblog to others and help spread the word! 

 Thank you,

Vivian Isaboke

Founder & Owner

This is Africa, Our Africa

dethklokvevo:

nablayah:

idilardayacad:

maleehaisconfused:

spikefuckingjonze:

anyone else noticing a trend here?

lol
didn’t know ancient egyptians looked like mayo…

RHAMSES IM CHOKING LIKE THEY DIDNT SEE THE STATUES OR NOTHING

Ok but of course the servants and thieves are black ok i see yall

this is bullshit. no one go see this bullshit movie

dethklokvevo:

nablayah:

idilardayacad:

maleehaisconfused:

spikefuckingjonze:

anyone else noticing a trend here?

lol

didn’t know ancient egyptians looked like mayo…

RHAMSES IM CHOKING LIKE THEY DIDNT SEE THE STATUES OR NOTHING

Ok but of course the servants and thieves are black ok i see yall

this is bullshit. no one go see this bullshit movie

beautiesofafrique:

Queen Anna Nzinga Ana de Sousa Nzinga Mbande, was a 17th-century queen of the Ndongo and Matamba Kingdoms of the Mbundu people in Angola 

Queen Nzinga was born to Ngola (King) Kiluanji and Kangela in 1583. According to tradition, she was named Nzinga because her umbilical cord was wrapped around her neck (the Kimbundu verb kujinga means to twist or turn). It was said to be an indication that the person who had this characteristic would be proud and haughty (and a wise women said to her mother that Nzinga will become queen one day.) According to her recollections later in life, she was greatly favoured by her father, who allowed her to witness as he governed his kingdom, and who carried her with him to war. 

In 1626 Nzinga became Queen of the Mbundu when her brother committed suicide in the face of rising Portuguese demands for slave trade concessions.  Nzinga, however, refused to allow them to control her nation.  In 1627, after forming alliances with former rival states, she led her army against the Portuguese, initiating a thirty year war against them.  She exploited European rivalry by forging an alliance with the Dutch who had conquered Luanda in 1641. With their help, Nzinga defeated a Portuguese army in 1647.  When the Dutch were in turn defeated by the Portuguese the following year and withdrew from Central Africa, Nzinga continued her struggle against the Portuguese.  Now in her 60s she still personally led troops in battle.   She also orchestrated guerilla attacks on the Portuguese which would continue long after her death and inspire the ultimately successful 20th Century armed resistance against the Portuguese that resulted in independent Angola in 1975.Despite repeated attempts by the Portuguese and their allies to capture or kill Queen Nzinga, she died peacefully in her eighties on December 17, 1663.

Read more/Sources: 1| 2

legrandcirque:

Twenty year old Honorine Kauanga (C), leaving the market. Photograph by Dmitri Kessel. Belgian Congo, April 1953.

legrandcirque:

Twenty year old Honorine Kauanga (C), leaving the market. Photograph by Dmitri Kessel. Belgian Congo, April 1953.

dynamicafrica:

Gwenn Dubourthoumieu photographs showing the abandoned ruins of former Congolese president Mobutu Sese Seko.

In Mobutu, the former billionaire dictator, Joseph Mobutu remains Maréchal Mobutu Sesse Seko, the ‘everlasting’.

In 1967, two years after his coup d’état, he transformed the small villages where he was raised into a city with great infrastructure. A dam, a hydroelectric factory, an airport and three opulent palaces all rose from the African bush.

Fourteen years after the President’s departure, nothing remains of these developments.

Destroyed by weather, overwhelmed by vegetation and devastated by robberies, the palaces of the supreme leader are little more than mere skeletons of their former selves, wholly devoid of their former splendor for the eyes of visitors. 

(x)

vintageblackglamour:

Happy Birthday Iman! Can you believe this fashion legend is 59 years old today? This photo was taken by the great Francesco Scavullo in 1977.

vintageblackglamour:

Happy Birthday Iman! Can you believe this fashion legend is 59 years old today? This photo was taken by the great Francesco Scavullo in 1977.