yagazieemezi:

Art Expressions: Ify Chiejina
"My mother passed away recently in February of 2014. The state of my own self-awareness and confidence before my mother’s death was in uninterrupted flux. After she died, those changes pushed me to seek stability. I have to be responsible for nurturing and taking care of my whole self. I have to be responsible for asking for help when I am in need. My mother was always cognitive of the fact that I had a strong interest in the arts, and thankfully she did bless my decision to be an artist, but her support came through my display of perseverance. She wasn’t the biggest advocate in me pursuing visual art professionally. She feared that I would struggle more than my counterparts pursuing careers in medicine or law. But essentially everybody struggles in an infinite number of ways. To me, being an artist means being your own superhero." - Ify
See more
Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram
Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic
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yagazieemezi:

Art Expressions: Ify Chiejina
"My mother passed away recently in February of 2014. The state of my own self-awareness and confidence before my mother’s death was in uninterrupted flux. After she died, those changes pushed me to seek stability. I have to be responsible for nurturing and taking care of my whole self. I have to be responsible for asking for help when I am in need. My mother was always cognitive of the fact that I had a strong interest in the arts, and thankfully she did bless my decision to be an artist, but her support came through my display of perseverance. She wasn’t the biggest advocate in me pursuing visual art professionally. She feared that I would struggle more than my counterparts pursuing careers in medicine or law. But essentially everybody struggles in an infinite number of ways. To me, being an artist means being your own superhero." - Ify
See more
Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram
Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic
ZoomInfo
yagazieemezi:

Art Expressions: Ify Chiejina
"My mother passed away recently in February of 2014. The state of my own self-awareness and confidence before my mother’s death was in uninterrupted flux. After she died, those changes pushed me to seek stability. I have to be responsible for nurturing and taking care of my whole self. I have to be responsible for asking for help when I am in need. My mother was always cognitive of the fact that I had a strong interest in the arts, and thankfully she did bless my decision to be an artist, but her support came through my display of perseverance. She wasn’t the biggest advocate in me pursuing visual art professionally. She feared that I would struggle more than my counterparts pursuing careers in medicine or law. But essentially everybody struggles in an infinite number of ways. To me, being an artist means being your own superhero." - Ify
See more
Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram
Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic
ZoomInfo
yagazieemezi:

Art Expressions: Ify Chiejina
"My mother passed away recently in February of 2014. The state of my own self-awareness and confidence before my mother’s death was in uninterrupted flux. After she died, those changes pushed me to seek stability. I have to be responsible for nurturing and taking care of my whole self. I have to be responsible for asking for help when I am in need. My mother was always cognitive of the fact that I had a strong interest in the arts, and thankfully she did bless my decision to be an artist, but her support came through my display of perseverance. She wasn’t the biggest advocate in me pursuing visual art professionally. She feared that I would struggle more than my counterparts pursuing careers in medicine or law. But essentially everybody struggles in an infinite number of ways. To me, being an artist means being your own superhero." - Ify
See more
Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram
Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic
ZoomInfo
yagazieemezi:

Art Expressions: Ify Chiejina
"My mother passed away recently in February of 2014. The state of my own self-awareness and confidence before my mother’s death was in uninterrupted flux. After she died, those changes pushed me to seek stability. I have to be responsible for nurturing and taking care of my whole self. I have to be responsible for asking for help when I am in need. My mother was always cognitive of the fact that I had a strong interest in the arts, and thankfully she did bless my decision to be an artist, but her support came through my display of perseverance. She wasn’t the biggest advocate in me pursuing visual art professionally. She feared that I would struggle more than my counterparts pursuing careers in medicine or law. But essentially everybody struggles in an infinite number of ways. To me, being an artist means being your own superhero." - Ify
See more
Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram
Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic
ZoomInfo
yagazieemezi:

Art Expressions: Ify Chiejina
"My mother passed away recently in February of 2014. The state of my own self-awareness and confidence before my mother’s death was in uninterrupted flux. After she died, those changes pushed me to seek stability. I have to be responsible for nurturing and taking care of my whole self. I have to be responsible for asking for help when I am in need. My mother was always cognitive of the fact that I had a strong interest in the arts, and thankfully she did bless my decision to be an artist, but her support came through my display of perseverance. She wasn’t the biggest advocate in me pursuing visual art professionally. She feared that I would struggle more than my counterparts pursuing careers in medicine or law. But essentially everybody struggles in an infinite number of ways. To me, being an artist means being your own superhero." - Ify
See more
Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram
Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic
ZoomInfo

yagazieemezi:

Art Expressions: Ify Chiejina

"My mother passed away recently in February of 2014. The state of my own self-awareness and confidence before my mother’s death was in uninterrupted flux. After she died, those changes pushed me to seek stability. I have to be responsible for nurturing and taking care of my whole self. I have to be responsible for asking for help when I am in need. My mother was always cognitive of the fact that I had a strong interest in the arts, and thankfully she did bless my decision to be an artist, but her support came through my display of perseverance. She wasn’t the biggest advocate in me pursuing visual art professionally. She feared that I would struggle more than my counterparts pursuing careers in medicine or law. But essentially everybody struggles in an infinite number of ways. To me, being an artist means being your own superhero." - Ify

See more

Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram

Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic

blackgirlcrisis:

curvesincolor:

Eh, I don’t like when people be like “black girls watch out cause white girls getting booty these days” cause to a black girl’s ears it kinda sounds like “watch out because your only value is your fetishized body and once that’s gone you’ll truly be worthless”.

i’m just gonna leave this here.

(Source: luvyourselfsomeesteem, via loveandjealousy)


Lupita Nyong’o attends the Sindika Dokolo Art Foundation dinner at Cafe Royal on October 18, 2014 in London, England.

Lupita Nyong’o attends the Sindika Dokolo Art Foundation dinner at Cafe Royal on October 18, 2014 in London, England.

(Source: lupita-nyongo)

They want Africans to only write about anything but love, it seems writing about war or poverty seems to be the only way to validate my African identity as a writer. They say Africans cannot write love poems, so i write bold love poems with African names. Let them read that! Ka ha rie nshi!
Ijeoma Umebinyuo (via theijeoma)
cecileemeke:

Support the #StrollingSeries (See full discussion HERE)
We want to take strolling everywhere: Stockholm, Kampala, Brooklyn, Lisbon, Buenos Aires, Berlin, Paris, Lagos, Accra, Moscow, Sydney, Addis Ababa, Dubai, Beijing, Miami, Kingston, Castries  - everywhere.
We want to give a voice to ordinary people of the diaspora. If you want to support us in making this a reality, please donate: http://donate.cecileemeke.com
Strolling: Connecting the scattered stories of the global African/Black Diaspora.
Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Soundcloud | Vimeo | Youtube
ZoomInfo
cecileemeke:

Support the #StrollingSeries (See full discussion HERE)
We want to take strolling everywhere: Stockholm, Kampala, Brooklyn, Lisbon, Buenos Aires, Berlin, Paris, Lagos, Accra, Moscow, Sydney, Addis Ababa, Dubai, Beijing, Miami, Kingston, Castries  - everywhere.
We want to give a voice to ordinary people of the diaspora. If you want to support us in making this a reality, please donate: http://donate.cecileemeke.com
Strolling: Connecting the scattered stories of the global African/Black Diaspora.
Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Soundcloud | Vimeo | Youtube
ZoomInfo
cecileemeke:

Support the #StrollingSeries (See full discussion HERE)
We want to take strolling everywhere: Stockholm, Kampala, Brooklyn, Lisbon, Buenos Aires, Berlin, Paris, Lagos, Accra, Moscow, Sydney, Addis Ababa, Dubai, Beijing, Miami, Kingston, Castries  - everywhere.
We want to give a voice to ordinary people of the diaspora. If you want to support us in making this a reality, please donate: http://donate.cecileemeke.com
Strolling: Connecting the scattered stories of the global African/Black Diaspora.
Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Soundcloud | Vimeo | Youtube
ZoomInfo
cecileemeke:

Support the #StrollingSeries (See full discussion HERE)
We want to take strolling everywhere: Stockholm, Kampala, Brooklyn, Lisbon, Buenos Aires, Berlin, Paris, Lagos, Accra, Moscow, Sydney, Addis Ababa, Dubai, Beijing, Miami, Kingston, Castries  - everywhere.
We want to give a voice to ordinary people of the diaspora. If you want to support us in making this a reality, please donate: http://donate.cecileemeke.com
Strolling: Connecting the scattered stories of the global African/Black Diaspora.
Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Soundcloud | Vimeo | Youtube
ZoomInfo
cecileemeke:

Support the #StrollingSeries (See full discussion HERE)
We want to take strolling everywhere: Stockholm, Kampala, Brooklyn, Lisbon, Buenos Aires, Berlin, Paris, Lagos, Accra, Moscow, Sydney, Addis Ababa, Dubai, Beijing, Miami, Kingston, Castries  - everywhere.
We want to give a voice to ordinary people of the diaspora. If you want to support us in making this a reality, please donate: http://donate.cecileemeke.com
Strolling: Connecting the scattered stories of the global African/Black Diaspora.
Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Soundcloud | Vimeo | Youtube
ZoomInfo
cecileemeke:

Support the #StrollingSeries (See full discussion HERE)
We want to take strolling everywhere: Stockholm, Kampala, Brooklyn, Lisbon, Buenos Aires, Berlin, Paris, Lagos, Accra, Moscow, Sydney, Addis Ababa, Dubai, Beijing, Miami, Kingston, Castries  - everywhere.
We want to give a voice to ordinary people of the diaspora. If you want to support us in making this a reality, please donate: http://donate.cecileemeke.com
Strolling: Connecting the scattered stories of the global African/Black Diaspora.
Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Soundcloud | Vimeo | Youtube
ZoomInfo
cecileemeke:

Support the #StrollingSeries (See full discussion HERE)
We want to take strolling everywhere: Stockholm, Kampala, Brooklyn, Lisbon, Buenos Aires, Berlin, Paris, Lagos, Accra, Moscow, Sydney, Addis Ababa, Dubai, Beijing, Miami, Kingston, Castries  - everywhere.
We want to give a voice to ordinary people of the diaspora. If you want to support us in making this a reality, please donate: http://donate.cecileemeke.com
Strolling: Connecting the scattered stories of the global African/Black Diaspora.
Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Soundcloud | Vimeo | Youtube
ZoomInfo
cecileemeke:

Support the #StrollingSeries (See full discussion HERE)
We want to take strolling everywhere: Stockholm, Kampala, Brooklyn, Lisbon, Buenos Aires, Berlin, Paris, Lagos, Accra, Moscow, Sydney, Addis Ababa, Dubai, Beijing, Miami, Kingston, Castries  - everywhere.
We want to give a voice to ordinary people of the diaspora. If you want to support us in making this a reality, please donate: http://donate.cecileemeke.com
Strolling: Connecting the scattered stories of the global African/Black Diaspora.
Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Soundcloud | Vimeo | Youtube
ZoomInfo

cecileemeke:

Support the #StrollingSeries (See full discussion HERE)

We want to take strolling everywhere: Stockholm, Kampala, Brooklyn, Lisbon, Buenos Aires, Berlin, Paris, Lagos, Accra, Moscow, Sydney, Addis Ababa, Dubai, Beijing, Miami, Kingston, Castries  - everywhere.

We want to give a voice to ordinary people of the diaspora. If you want to support us in making this a reality, please donate: http://donate.cecileemeke.com

Strolling: Connecting the scattered stories of the global African/Black Diaspora.

Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Soundcloud | Vimeo | Youtube

(via talesofastolenafrican)

princeofthots:


Alek Wek and Lupita Nyong’o attend the Sindika Dokolo Art Foundation dinner at Cafe Royal on October 18, 2014 in London, England.

This is so f*cking important

princeofthots:

Alek Wek and Lupita Nyong’o attend the Sindika Dokolo Art Foundation dinner at Cafe Royal on October 18, 2014 in London, England.

This is so f*cking important

(Source: lupita-nyongo)

dawnieofanewday:

micdotcom:

Ebola fear is turning into all-out racism

The American public’s reaction to the Ebola virus outbreak that’s killed over 4,000 people has moved from concern to outright xenophobia
Call it “Ebola racism.” With the death of Liberian Thomas E.Duncan at a Dallas hospital last week and news that two nurses who treated him have contracted the deadly illness, increasingly paranoid Americans are treating immigrants and visitors from Ebola-ravaged countries like Liberia, Guinea and Sierra Leone like lepers. 
"People, once they know you are Liberian — people assume you have the virus in your body." | Follow micdotcom


And I’m not surprised

dawnieofanewday:

micdotcom:

Ebola fear is turning into all-out racism

The American public’s reaction to the Ebola virus outbreak that’s killed over 4,000 people has moved from concern to outright xenophobia

Call it “Ebola racism.” With the death of Liberian Thomas E.Duncan at a Dallas hospital last week and news that two nurses who treated him have contracted the deadly illness, increasingly paranoid Americans are treating immigrants and visitors from Ebola-ravaged countries like Liberia, Guinea and Sierra Leone like lepers. 

"People, once they know you are Liberian — people assume you have the virus in your body." | Follow micdotcom

And I’m not surprised

(via eastafriqueen)

aadatart:

EXHIBITION: New Work by Lakin Ogunbanwo, Oct 8 - Nov 15, 2014
WHATIFTHEWORLD introduces its first exhibition with Lakin Ogunbanwo. Working at the confluence of fashion photography and classical portraiture, young Nigerian photographer Lakin Ogunbanwo creates enigmatic portraits with an erotic and subversive undertone. His subjects exist defiantly in the frame often masked by shadow, drapery and foliage. His use of vibrant flat colour and bold compositions form a more minimalist homage to the african studio photography popular in the 1960s and 70’s.
Pop. Fashion. Vogue. Ogunbanwo’s camera looks with the gaze of one curious of the language of desire. His images celebrate the sculptural nature of the body. The texture of a scar, hair or clothing are agents to draw our awareness to the body as a form, sculpted by light and muscle and clothing. The lustre of skin is enhanced through oiling and juxtaposes the naked with the clothed. Ogunbanwo’s figures are sculpted by light and framed as objects by the camera reminiscent of Robert Mapplethorp or Man Ray. Rather than colour, it is light that defines Ogunbanwo’s images. 
-African & Afro-Diasporan Art Talks
Join us: Twitter | Instagram | Facebook | Google+ | ART SHOP 
ZoomInfo
aadatart:

EXHIBITION: New Work by Lakin Ogunbanwo, Oct 8 - Nov 15, 2014
WHATIFTHEWORLD introduces its first exhibition with Lakin Ogunbanwo. Working at the confluence of fashion photography and classical portraiture, young Nigerian photographer Lakin Ogunbanwo creates enigmatic portraits with an erotic and subversive undertone. His subjects exist defiantly in the frame often masked by shadow, drapery and foliage. His use of vibrant flat colour and bold compositions form a more minimalist homage to the african studio photography popular in the 1960s and 70’s.
Pop. Fashion. Vogue. Ogunbanwo’s camera looks with the gaze of one curious of the language of desire. His images celebrate the sculptural nature of the body. The texture of a scar, hair or clothing are agents to draw our awareness to the body as a form, sculpted by light and muscle and clothing. The lustre of skin is enhanced through oiling and juxtaposes the naked with the clothed. Ogunbanwo’s figures are sculpted by light and framed as objects by the camera reminiscent of Robert Mapplethorp or Man Ray. Rather than colour, it is light that defines Ogunbanwo’s images. 
-African & Afro-Diasporan Art Talks
Join us: Twitter | Instagram | Facebook | Google+ | ART SHOP 
ZoomInfo
aadatart:

EXHIBITION: New Work by Lakin Ogunbanwo, Oct 8 - Nov 15, 2014
WHATIFTHEWORLD introduces its first exhibition with Lakin Ogunbanwo. Working at the confluence of fashion photography and classical portraiture, young Nigerian photographer Lakin Ogunbanwo creates enigmatic portraits with an erotic and subversive undertone. His subjects exist defiantly in the frame often masked by shadow, drapery and foliage. His use of vibrant flat colour and bold compositions form a more minimalist homage to the african studio photography popular in the 1960s and 70’s.
Pop. Fashion. Vogue. Ogunbanwo’s camera looks with the gaze of one curious of the language of desire. His images celebrate the sculptural nature of the body. The texture of a scar, hair or clothing are agents to draw our awareness to the body as a form, sculpted by light and muscle and clothing. The lustre of skin is enhanced through oiling and juxtaposes the naked with the clothed. Ogunbanwo’s figures are sculpted by light and framed as objects by the camera reminiscent of Robert Mapplethorp or Man Ray. Rather than colour, it is light that defines Ogunbanwo’s images. 
-African & Afro-Diasporan Art Talks
Join us: Twitter | Instagram | Facebook | Google+ | ART SHOP 
ZoomInfo
aadatart:

EXHIBITION: New Work by Lakin Ogunbanwo, Oct 8 - Nov 15, 2014
WHATIFTHEWORLD introduces its first exhibition with Lakin Ogunbanwo. Working at the confluence of fashion photography and classical portraiture, young Nigerian photographer Lakin Ogunbanwo creates enigmatic portraits with an erotic and subversive undertone. His subjects exist defiantly in the frame often masked by shadow, drapery and foliage. His use of vibrant flat colour and bold compositions form a more minimalist homage to the african studio photography popular in the 1960s and 70’s.
Pop. Fashion. Vogue. Ogunbanwo’s camera looks with the gaze of one curious of the language of desire. His images celebrate the sculptural nature of the body. The texture of a scar, hair or clothing are agents to draw our awareness to the body as a form, sculpted by light and muscle and clothing. The lustre of skin is enhanced through oiling and juxtaposes the naked with the clothed. Ogunbanwo’s figures are sculpted by light and framed as objects by the camera reminiscent of Robert Mapplethorp or Man Ray. Rather than colour, it is light that defines Ogunbanwo’s images. 
-African & Afro-Diasporan Art Talks
Join us: Twitter | Instagram | Facebook | Google+ | ART SHOP 
ZoomInfo
aadatart:

EXHIBITION: New Work by Lakin Ogunbanwo, Oct 8 - Nov 15, 2014
WHATIFTHEWORLD introduces its first exhibition with Lakin Ogunbanwo. Working at the confluence of fashion photography and classical portraiture, young Nigerian photographer Lakin Ogunbanwo creates enigmatic portraits with an erotic and subversive undertone. His subjects exist defiantly in the frame often masked by shadow, drapery and foliage. His use of vibrant flat colour and bold compositions form a more minimalist homage to the african studio photography popular in the 1960s and 70’s.
Pop. Fashion. Vogue. Ogunbanwo’s camera looks with the gaze of one curious of the language of desire. His images celebrate the sculptural nature of the body. The texture of a scar, hair or clothing are agents to draw our awareness to the body as a form, sculpted by light and muscle and clothing. The lustre of skin is enhanced through oiling and juxtaposes the naked with the clothed. Ogunbanwo’s figures are sculpted by light and framed as objects by the camera reminiscent of Robert Mapplethorp or Man Ray. Rather than colour, it is light that defines Ogunbanwo’s images. 
-African & Afro-Diasporan Art Talks
Join us: Twitter | Instagram | Facebook | Google+ | ART SHOP 
ZoomInfo
aadatart:

EXHIBITION: New Work by Lakin Ogunbanwo, Oct 8 - Nov 15, 2014
WHATIFTHEWORLD introduces its first exhibition with Lakin Ogunbanwo. Working at the confluence of fashion photography and classical portraiture, young Nigerian photographer Lakin Ogunbanwo creates enigmatic portraits with an erotic and subversive undertone. His subjects exist defiantly in the frame often masked by shadow, drapery and foliage. His use of vibrant flat colour and bold compositions form a more minimalist homage to the african studio photography popular in the 1960s and 70’s.
Pop. Fashion. Vogue. Ogunbanwo’s camera looks with the gaze of one curious of the language of desire. His images celebrate the sculptural nature of the body. The texture of a scar, hair or clothing are agents to draw our awareness to the body as a form, sculpted by light and muscle and clothing. The lustre of skin is enhanced through oiling and juxtaposes the naked with the clothed. Ogunbanwo’s figures are sculpted by light and framed as objects by the camera reminiscent of Robert Mapplethorp or Man Ray. Rather than colour, it is light that defines Ogunbanwo’s images. 
-African & Afro-Diasporan Art Talks
Join us: Twitter | Instagram | Facebook | Google+ | ART SHOP 
ZoomInfo
aadatart:

EXHIBITION: New Work by Lakin Ogunbanwo, Oct 8 - Nov 15, 2014
WHATIFTHEWORLD introduces its first exhibition with Lakin Ogunbanwo. Working at the confluence of fashion photography and classical portraiture, young Nigerian photographer Lakin Ogunbanwo creates enigmatic portraits with an erotic and subversive undertone. His subjects exist defiantly in the frame often masked by shadow, drapery and foliage. His use of vibrant flat colour and bold compositions form a more minimalist homage to the african studio photography popular in the 1960s and 70’s.
Pop. Fashion. Vogue. Ogunbanwo’s camera looks with the gaze of one curious of the language of desire. His images celebrate the sculptural nature of the body. The texture of a scar, hair or clothing are agents to draw our awareness to the body as a form, sculpted by light and muscle and clothing. The lustre of skin is enhanced through oiling and juxtaposes the naked with the clothed. Ogunbanwo’s figures are sculpted by light and framed as objects by the camera reminiscent of Robert Mapplethorp or Man Ray. Rather than colour, it is light that defines Ogunbanwo’s images. 
-African & Afro-Diasporan Art Talks
Join us: Twitter | Instagram | Facebook | Google+ | ART SHOP 
ZoomInfo
aadatart:

EXHIBITION: New Work by Lakin Ogunbanwo, Oct 8 - Nov 15, 2014
WHATIFTHEWORLD introduces its first exhibition with Lakin Ogunbanwo. Working at the confluence of fashion photography and classical portraiture, young Nigerian photographer Lakin Ogunbanwo creates enigmatic portraits with an erotic and subversive undertone. His subjects exist defiantly in the frame often masked by shadow, drapery and foliage. His use of vibrant flat colour and bold compositions form a more minimalist homage to the african studio photography popular in the 1960s and 70’s.
Pop. Fashion. Vogue. Ogunbanwo’s camera looks with the gaze of one curious of the language of desire. His images celebrate the sculptural nature of the body. The texture of a scar, hair or clothing are agents to draw our awareness to the body as a form, sculpted by light and muscle and clothing. The lustre of skin is enhanced through oiling and juxtaposes the naked with the clothed. Ogunbanwo’s figures are sculpted by light and framed as objects by the camera reminiscent of Robert Mapplethorp or Man Ray. Rather than colour, it is light that defines Ogunbanwo’s images. 
-African & Afro-Diasporan Art Talks
Join us: Twitter | Instagram | Facebook | Google+ | ART SHOP 
ZoomInfo
aadatart:

EXHIBITION: New Work by Lakin Ogunbanwo, Oct 8 - Nov 15, 2014
WHATIFTHEWORLD introduces its first exhibition with Lakin Ogunbanwo. Working at the confluence of fashion photography and classical portraiture, young Nigerian photographer Lakin Ogunbanwo creates enigmatic portraits with an erotic and subversive undertone. His subjects exist defiantly in the frame often masked by shadow, drapery and foliage. His use of vibrant flat colour and bold compositions form a more minimalist homage to the african studio photography popular in the 1960s and 70’s.
Pop. Fashion. Vogue. Ogunbanwo’s camera looks with the gaze of one curious of the language of desire. His images celebrate the sculptural nature of the body. The texture of a scar, hair or clothing are agents to draw our awareness to the body as a form, sculpted by light and muscle and clothing. The lustre of skin is enhanced through oiling and juxtaposes the naked with the clothed. Ogunbanwo’s figures are sculpted by light and framed as objects by the camera reminiscent of Robert Mapplethorp or Man Ray. Rather than colour, it is light that defines Ogunbanwo’s images. 
-African & Afro-Diasporan Art Talks
Join us: Twitter | Instagram | Facebook | Google+ | ART SHOP 
ZoomInfo
aadatart:

EXHIBITION: New Work by Lakin Ogunbanwo, Oct 8 - Nov 15, 2014
WHATIFTHEWORLD introduces its first exhibition with Lakin Ogunbanwo. Working at the confluence of fashion photography and classical portraiture, young Nigerian photographer Lakin Ogunbanwo creates enigmatic portraits with an erotic and subversive undertone. His subjects exist defiantly in the frame often masked by shadow, drapery and foliage. His use of vibrant flat colour and bold compositions form a more minimalist homage to the african studio photography popular in the 1960s and 70’s.
Pop. Fashion. Vogue. Ogunbanwo’s camera looks with the gaze of one curious of the language of desire. His images celebrate the sculptural nature of the body. The texture of a scar, hair or clothing are agents to draw our awareness to the body as a form, sculpted by light and muscle and clothing. The lustre of skin is enhanced through oiling and juxtaposes the naked with the clothed. Ogunbanwo’s figures are sculpted by light and framed as objects by the camera reminiscent of Robert Mapplethorp or Man Ray. Rather than colour, it is light that defines Ogunbanwo’s images. 
-African & Afro-Diasporan Art Talks
Join us: Twitter | Instagram | Facebook | Google+ | ART SHOP 
ZoomInfo

aadatart:

EXHIBITION: New Work by Lakin Ogunbanwo, Oct 8 - Nov 15, 2014

WHATIFTHEWORLD introduces its first exhibition with Lakin Ogunbanwo. Working at the confluence of fashion photography and classical portraiture, young Nigerian photographer Lakin Ogunbanwo creates enigmatic portraits with an erotic and subversive undertone. His subjects exist defiantly in the frame often masked by shadow, drapery and foliage. His use of vibrant flat colour and bold compositions form a more minimalist homage to the african studio photography popular in the 1960s and 70’s.

Pop. Fashion. Vogue. Ogunbanwo’s camera looks with the gaze of one curious of the language of desire. His images celebrate the sculptural nature of the body. The texture of a scar, hair or clothing are agents to draw our awareness to the body as a form, sculpted by light and muscle and clothing. The lustre of skin is enhanced through oiling and juxtaposes the naked with the clothed. Ogunbanwo’s figures are sculpted by light and framed as objects by the camera reminiscent of Robert Mapplethorp or Man Ray. Rather than colour, it is light that defines Ogunbanwo’s images. 

-African & Afro-Diasporan Art Talks

Join us: Twitter | Instagram | Facebook | Google+ | ART SHOP 

(via lowkey-with-it)

micdotcom:

Powerful portraits of the Liberians who beat Ebola 

To help humanize the overwhelming statistics, Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer and senior staff photographer at Getty Images, John Moore, visited an Ebola treatment center of the organization, Doctors Without Borders in Paynesville, Liberia. At the treatment center, survivors spoke about the brothers, sisters, husbands and wives they lost due to the disease. They also spoke of recovery, stigmas they continue to face in their villages and renewed hope.
Follow micdotcom
ZoomInfo
micdotcom:

Powerful portraits of the Liberians who beat Ebola 

To help humanize the overwhelming statistics, Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer and senior staff photographer at Getty Images, John Moore, visited an Ebola treatment center of the organization, Doctors Without Borders in Paynesville, Liberia. At the treatment center, survivors spoke about the brothers, sisters, husbands and wives they lost due to the disease. They also spoke of recovery, stigmas they continue to face in their villages and renewed hope.
Follow micdotcom
ZoomInfo
micdotcom:

Powerful portraits of the Liberians who beat Ebola 

To help humanize the overwhelming statistics, Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer and senior staff photographer at Getty Images, John Moore, visited an Ebola treatment center of the organization, Doctors Without Borders in Paynesville, Liberia. At the treatment center, survivors spoke about the brothers, sisters, husbands and wives they lost due to the disease. They also spoke of recovery, stigmas they continue to face in their villages and renewed hope.
Follow micdotcom
ZoomInfo
micdotcom:

Powerful portraits of the Liberians who beat Ebola 

To help humanize the overwhelming statistics, Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer and senior staff photographer at Getty Images, John Moore, visited an Ebola treatment center of the organization, Doctors Without Borders in Paynesville, Liberia. At the treatment center, survivors spoke about the brothers, sisters, husbands and wives they lost due to the disease. They also spoke of recovery, stigmas they continue to face in their villages and renewed hope.
Follow micdotcom
ZoomInfo
micdotcom:

Powerful portraits of the Liberians who beat Ebola 

To help humanize the overwhelming statistics, Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer and senior staff photographer at Getty Images, John Moore, visited an Ebola treatment center of the organization, Doctors Without Borders in Paynesville, Liberia. At the treatment center, survivors spoke about the brothers, sisters, husbands and wives they lost due to the disease. They also spoke of recovery, stigmas they continue to face in their villages and renewed hope.
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micdotcom:

Powerful portraits of the Liberians who beat Ebola 

To help humanize the overwhelming statistics, Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer and senior staff photographer at Getty Images, John Moore, visited an Ebola treatment center of the organization, Doctors Without Borders in Paynesville, Liberia. At the treatment center, survivors spoke about the brothers, sisters, husbands and wives they lost due to the disease. They also spoke of recovery, stigmas they continue to face in their villages and renewed hope.
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micdotcom:

Powerful portraits of the Liberians who beat Ebola 

To help humanize the overwhelming statistics, Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer and senior staff photographer at Getty Images, John Moore, visited an Ebola treatment center of the organization, Doctors Without Borders in Paynesville, Liberia. At the treatment center, survivors spoke about the brothers, sisters, husbands and wives they lost due to the disease. They also spoke of recovery, stigmas they continue to face in their villages and renewed hope.
Follow micdotcom
ZoomInfo
micdotcom:

Powerful portraits of the Liberians who beat Ebola 

To help humanize the overwhelming statistics, Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer and senior staff photographer at Getty Images, John Moore, visited an Ebola treatment center of the organization, Doctors Without Borders in Paynesville, Liberia. At the treatment center, survivors spoke about the brothers, sisters, husbands and wives they lost due to the disease. They also spoke of recovery, stigmas they continue to face in their villages and renewed hope.
Follow micdotcom
ZoomInfo
micdotcom:

Powerful portraits of the Liberians who beat Ebola 

To help humanize the overwhelming statistics, Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer and senior staff photographer at Getty Images, John Moore, visited an Ebola treatment center of the organization, Doctors Without Borders in Paynesville, Liberia. At the treatment center, survivors spoke about the brothers, sisters, husbands and wives they lost due to the disease. They also spoke of recovery, stigmas they continue to face in their villages and renewed hope.
Follow micdotcom
ZoomInfo

micdotcom:

Powerful portraits of the Liberians who beat Ebola 

To help humanize the overwhelming statistics, Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer and senior staff photographer at Getty Images, John Moore, visited an Ebola treatment center of the organization, Doctors Without Borders in Paynesville, Liberia. At the treatment center, survivors spoke about the brothers, sisters, husbands and wives they lost due to the disease. They also spoke of recovery, stigmas they continue to face in their villages and renewed hope.

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